Brave new world

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09c5622/brave-new-world-back-home

Over four years and across seven hours of television William Crawley has travelled to America, Canada, New Zealand and Australia to tell the stories of some remarkable Ulster-Scots men and women who made their mark in the New World. Now he returns to home soil to find out what those stories reveal about the Ulster-Scots diaspora as a whole and how the loss of sons and daughters, neighbours and friends over generations has made emigration part of our story and of this world, Back Home

 

Row on Row, East Belfast

Row on Row East Belfast, which Dalaradia take part in every year – starts on 5th November.

To mark the opening a scooter cavalcade will leave Belfast City Hall at 1.30 and the above date with their arrival at Row on Row, Pitt Park, Newtownards Road being around 2pm.

 

Come and see them arrive on what will be a great occasion.

Also, there will be a community service on Wednesday 8th November at 3.30 and we would particularly encourage community groups, school kids etc to attend.

There will also be two night time Remembrance events on the 9th and 10th November.

All welcome – Lest we forget

PBS – Martin Luther – Complete documentary

Finally the LCC Tanzania Project challenge is over.

Finally the LCC Tanzania Project challenge is over.
 
All arrived home safe and sound yesterday evening and with the exception of a few mosquito bites everyone is in good health and condition.
 
Berty, a member of Dalaradia, remarked “the trip started with three groups of strangers and ended with one group of family”.
 
The month away raised some challenges but as each challenge was overcome the bond of friendship grew stronger. The children of the orphanage touched their hearts and have shaped their lives for the future.
 
This is something we hope to build on for the future helping less fortune people. One very important aspect of motivation is the willingness to stop and to look at things that no one else has bothered to look at. Most human beings have an almost infinite capacity for taking things for granted. Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many – not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.
 
Well done to everyone involved, you are a credit to your community.
 
For more information on this project check out:

Reformation day

Just 12 days to go until Reformation Day 2017.

In the run up to it, we will be sharing various articles and videos.

The Protesant Reformation was, first and foremost, all about the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It was then, and it still is now.

 

On this day….

On 13th October 1994, after a long process of consultation with members and activists across Northern Ireland, the Combined Loyalist Military Command representing the Red Hand Commando, Ulster Volunteer Force and the Ulster Defence Association, called a ceasefire bringing loyalists fully into the peace process.

 

The overwhelming majority appeared – and still appear – to be relieved that that part of their lives is long over and, hopefully, gone forever.

Along with many working behind the scenes people like Winston Rea and William Smith played a pivotal role in negotiations with the latter chairing the announcement.

Today?

A day with uncertainty, a day with a younger generation not experiencing as much killing, but feeling the effects of the continuing erosion of Protestant/Unionist/Loyalist culture through parades, flags and government appeasement.

Today a dissident threat still looms, focusing more on security forces. We ask them is it worth it? What legacy will we leave our children? The choice is yours!

Happy Ulster Day!

Happy Ulster Day!

Ulster’s Solemn League and Covenant, commonly known as the Ulster Covenant, was signed by just under half a million Irishmen and women on and before 28 September 1912, in protest against the Third Home Rule Bill introduced by the British Government in the same year.

 

Sir Edward Carson was the first person to sign the Covenant at Belfast City Hall with a silver pen, followed by Lord Londonderry (the former viceroy of Ireland), representatives of the Protestant churches, and then by Sir James Craig.

We, their descendants, just as they were, are duty bound to defend our country and its people from any perceived threat to our way of life.

Flags

On 12th May 2016 the Loyalist Communities Council launched a Flags Protocol.

 

Its aim, to prevent our national emblems being left on display in a dilapidated state and asking that steps were taken to prevent this occurring.

Dalaradia, as part of the LCC, ask that, as agreed, all remaining flags be taken down on or as as soon as possible after Ulster Day – 28th September 2017.

Flags and emblems are highly potent symbols of community allegiances and are important demonstrators of our Loyalist and Unionist heritage and culture.

Please treat them as such – many thanks.

http://www.lcc-ni.com/
http://www.reachproject.co.uk/

Straight to work

5 days in and after some sight seeing and experiencing local culture the guys are now settled and its straight to work in Africa for the LCC Tanzania Project.

The purpose of this project is to promote team building, international work experience and youth development with the volunteers and to expose these youth to different cultures, religions and challenges and at the same time benefit the needy children of the orphanage. The aim is to make a difference both at home and in Africa.

 

https://www.facebook.com/lcctanzaniaproject/
http://www.lcc-ni.com/
http://www.reachproject.co.uk/

Article

“RED HAND COMMANDO” (RHC) FORMALLY REQUESTS TO BE REMOVED AS A “PROSCRIBED” ORGANISATION

The Loyalist grouping known as the Red Hand Commando (RHC) has officially requested to be removed from the list of proscribed organisations. The request was made in London and will be looked at by the Home Secretary Amber Rudd. At the time of writing it is not known how long it will take for a decision to be made. Reaction to the request has been somewhat mixed.

The application has been made under Section 4 of the Terrorism Act (2000) which allows for members of a banned group to contact the government to request deproscription without themselves facing the threat of being charged with membership. The theory being that deproscription could help an organisation move forward towards integration and obviously away from previous association with violence.

The initiative is being supported by the Loyalist Communities Council (LCC), the umbrella organisation set up by Tony Blair’s former chief of staff Jonathan Powell to steer paramilitaries away from criminality, and the LCC’s chairman, David Campbell, said that Mr Powell supported the application to the Home Secretary. Mr Campbell argued that in retaining the paramilitary name, rather than disbanding, it would be harder for dissidents to seek to revive it at a future point. There has always been a fear that ‘dissident’ Loyalists could use the name of the three main Loyalist paramilitary organisations as a cover for criminal activity.

Senior Loyalist Jim Wilson (a former RHC prisoner) stated that;

“This organisation is not about glorifying murder, bombings, shootings – it happened in a conflict that we got engaged in as young lads and it’s not something that people want to run about and gloat about and to have it pushed into people’s faces. That’s not what deprosciption is about – it’s about allowing us to move to the next phase which is out of conflict, away from what happened in this society and all those people that were hurt by our organisation, Gusty Spence couldn’t have said it any better – it is true and abject remorse. But we were brought up in a society where there was violence and young lads from our Protestant community engaged in it and that’s it – the organisation couldn’t be any clearer; it’s sorry for the people that had to be hurt in this conflict.”

The words obviously hit a nerve with Gerry Kelly of Sinn Fein as he described the move as ‘abhorrent’. When it was pointed out to him that his actions and the actions of his former IRA colleagues went beyond abhorrent into mass sectarian genocide and that it was hypocritical of him to even comment on this move he decided to skulk off elsewhere. But there was widespread concern amongst victims groups that, in not dealing with the needs of victims and their families first, this type of move could be seen as too soon and too upsetting. Others welcomed the move and saw it as progressive and potentially ground-breaking.

Then there is the “politics” of it all and the repercussions should such a decision be given a positive outcome. Some seasoned political commentators queried what sane government would give the go ahead to legalise a former paramilitary group? What are the benefits to a Tory government when the media exposes Loyalist criminality (or what purports to be Loyalist criminality)? This idea could prove toxic to a government with a slim majority. In turn would those groupings intent on criminality latch on to “legal” groupings to ensure a type of “cover” or veneer of respectability? And the government will worry about the negative headlines around this. Then again the U.K. Government might just offer the suggestion that all this is pointless and groupings should leave the stage voluntarily. Which in turn creates a vacuum to be filled by criminal elements masquerading as loyalists. It is a complex issue indeed.

There is no doubt that within Loyalism there continues to be great desires to remodel and copper fasten the progress achieved during the last decade. Any new initiative to speed up reintegration must be viewed through a prism of positivity if we are to bring everyone forward. The removal of proscription carries with it many risks and it will be interesting to see how the mainland politicians deal with such a request.”

End